Static, Fixed, Relative and Absolute Positioning

Lesson Details:
July 10, 2020


I: Introduction

I: Introduction:

This article is all about the programming languages and how they work in the computer systems. It will discuss the various forms of programming languages and explain their function in detail.

II: Body

II: Body:

Part 1: Static, fixed, relative and absolute positioning:

Static position: this is like pasting a label on a piece of paper which is glued to the wall. The label is the same no matter where you move or where you look at it from. You can change what is written on a label but you cannot move it around or change its shape.

Fixed position: this is like a label that is stuck onto a moving object. If you move the object, the label will move with it, but not independently of it. The label’s position is determined by the position of the object to which it is attached.

Relative position: This is like a label that slides along a string that it has been attached to. The label still refers to the same object, but it can be moved independently of that object.

Absolute Positioning: This is like a label that has a string tied to a nail on a wall, and the string has a second nail on its other end. The second nail can be moved around anywhere on the wall while the first nail remains fixed in place. This is similar to absolute positioning, but since there are two nails involved, both can be positioned anywhere on any surface. In the real world, an object that is stuck to an object that can be moved, such as a boat stuck to a ship or a train stuck to a track, works in a similar way. To determine the position of each of them, you have to add together their relative positions from one another and from the center of mass of the collection of objects together. This is called ‘vector addition’.

To see what this means visually, imagine two people are standing at opposite sides of the room, holding strings with weights hanging from each end. One person holds their string taut stretching from their hand to their feet, while the other person holds theirs taut, stretching from their hand to their head. At this point, both strings are connected to each other at their extremes, creating an X shape between them. Now imagine if these two people were made to walk toward each other until they met in the middle of the room. As they walked together, they would create two new lines between their strings, an X-Y formation with four points where all three lines intersected with each other. If you added up all four points together, you would have one point representing the exact center point of the X shape between them. Now imagine if these people continued walking together until they started passing each other. If you added up all four points again, you would not have one point representing the exact center point of the X shape between them anymore because one person would have moved beyond their opposing partner, leaving only three points where all three lines intersected with each other instead of four. This is similar to how two objects will interact when only one of them can be moved while the other cannot. When one of them moves relative to its fixed counterpart, both will interact with one another in some manner, altering their relative positions as they go.

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